MOMRadioStephaniRuperDesiree Wolfe has been a marketing expert since she was 12 years old. She used to help her mother, a single mompreneur, with her business and sort of always loved the freedom of it. She worked in a corporate job, but the moment she had her daughter she knew she wanted something more for her family. Desiree sits down with Rosemary and shares some fantastic tips that every entrepreneurial mom out there can use today on Motivating Other Moms show.

Key Takeaways:

2:20 – Desiree worked on her mom’s business when she was growing up, so the entrepreneur bug was always with her.

10:35 – When she was trying to narrow down her business, she sat down and mapped things out on what she wanted and didn’t want to do.

15:40 – When you niche your business, you actually make more money than you think because you have more time on your hands to focus on your talents.

18:20 – If your target market doesn’t stick the first time, sometimes you need to re-work your plan and try your target audience again. Don’t give up.

20:30 – The real break through happens when you finally change your mindset.

22:15 – You don’t have to have a huge following on social media in order to make a lot of money.

25:00 – You don’t need a million followers, you just need 10 good friends who believe in you and love the passion you have for your job.

27:15 – When is it time to hire help? The second you spend more time answering your emails than you do building your business. Don’t wait.

39:25 – Desiree has a big potty mouth, but she finds it has enhanced her business because she’s just being herself.

43:15 – You have to stand out nowadays. You have to have personality.

47:05 – Desiree brings in experts to help moms know how to succeed in their own business.

48:00 – Favorite book? Launch – by Jeff Walker and Train Your Brain – by Dana Wilde

Tweetables

“People think you need 100k followers to get Oprah’s attention. No, you don’t! You just have to a really good business!” Tweet this!

“You don’t need a billion social media followers, you need 10 good friends who are willing to talk about your business because you’re good.” Tweet this!

“Okay, if I were to pay somebody, how much more money could I make if I wasn’t spending 3 hours answering my emails every morning?” Tweet this!

Mentioned In The Episode

Launch – by Jeff Walker

Train Your Brain – by Dana Wilde

https://www.facebook.com/DesireeMarketing

https://twitter.com/DesireeMktg

http://desireemarketing.com/

Transcript

Rosemary Nickel:

Hi, this is Rosemary Nickel at Motivating Other Moms radio and welcome to another amazing episode of Motivating Other Moms. I am with Desiree Wolfe, a mompreneur marketing strategist. Welcome Desiree!

Desiree Wolfe:

Hi Rosemary. Thank you so much for having me here.

Rosemary:

I’m happy to have you here. Let’s start off by talking about how many kids do you have and how old are they?

Desiree:

Sure, I have two and my daughter will be 7 in just a couple of months and my son just hit 20 months, so I’ve got two little ones. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

You’re a busy momma!

Desiree:

Yes, I am. From the second till my eyes open in the morning to the second I pass out on the couch at night. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

*Laughter*. I used to pass out on the couch all the time.

Desiree:

Yes, I think that’s a stable when you’re a busy mom.

Rosemary:

You’re so determined to stay awake and enjoy the evening.

Desiree:

Yes, I want to enjoy that one show and the second the theme music starts, that’s it, I’m out!

Rosemary:

It’s kind of like kids that want to stay up to see what happens after they go to bed and you just can’t do it! *Laughter*.

Desiree:

Exactly. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

So, tell us a little bit about your journey and how you became a mompreneur?

Desiree:

Well, I think I’ve had entrepreneur spirit in my blood. My mom, when she divorced my step-dad, decided how she was going to support me is she started her own business. I was always able to watch her from the dining room and I got to see her build her business and she had the flexibility of being there for me when I got home from school. I thought, “wow, this is cool.” She makes her own hours, she’s her own boss, she determines how much money she’s going to make, so I got the bug at the young age and by 12 I was actually helping her out doing some marketing materials and helping her build her very first website.

So, it started when I was young and then I worked in the corporate work. I tried that out thinking it was what I had to do, what I was suppose to do to make money. After my daughter was born, I realized there’s so much more than building someone else’s dream. I got the opportunity to work from home, what was suppose to be a temporary situation, working with a past colleague, turned into a full time business that is now thriving and growing and I just love it. The bug was always there and luckily things worked out for me and I was able to leave the corporate work and now here I am!

Rosemary:

Wow, now you actually worked in Vegas for a while and thought you were going to make a lot of money doing that.

Desiree:

I did! I moved to Vegas as a single, young woman ready to rock the hospitality industry. I was working in some of the big fancy hotels catering sales and events and helping people build their weddings and their big days and it just, you know, after my daughter was born, I realized my tolerance level of dealing with evil people had suddenly gone down.

I was working at a direct sales company for several years and then I got the bug to go back to several hotels, so I took a position as a sales manager at a hotel and I just couldn’t do it. I was often working till 3am and coming home and having to turn around and having to leave again, it didn’t work out. It was kind of ripping my soul out, as I like to say. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

*Laughter*. Oh! I totally understanding that. I think that can happen in just about any industry at some point, especially when you become a mom and start understanding the value of your time and what’s more important.

Desiree:

That’s so true. You know, your priorities totally shit. I thought I was be able to have the corporate life and have my daughter at the same time. I was really finding that I..the person that wanted to travel and work all the time, was suddenly wanting to be home a whole lot more.

Rosemary:

Exactly. So, when you decided to quit and stay home, did you already have a business in mind or did you cut ties and leave?

Desiree:

Well, actually, years ago I had thought about starting a virtual assistant business because I love supporting other entrepreneurs and that’s where I had that mind, but when my past colleague approached me, she needed some marketing help.

So I thought, “You know, that’ll be great.” So I adventured out and started asking more people, “Do you need help marketing your small business? I’ve been doing it pretty much since I was 12. How can I help you?” It really just kind of grew, “This is what I think I wanna do.” To being really a support for entrepreneurs and helping them build their business, not just through marketing, but also through virtual assistant services at the time. I thought I had something in mind, but it just kind of grew overnight. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

And, how long did you stay in that business?

Desiree:

I actually did that for about a year and a half and then I made a big jump to offer more public relations and marketing strategy services. Now, what I do is I help mompreneurs with their marketing and business strategies. So, I did the marketing and the assistance for about a year and a half and then it morphed into more coaching and more strategizing.

Rosemary:

Then, you had your second baby after you starting these businesses, how was that for you going from 1 to 2 children and having your own business?

Desiree:

Adding baby number 2 rocked my world!

Rosemary:

Oh yeah? *Laughter*.

Desiree:

I had it all figured out with my daughter. Our scheduled worked really well. She wasn’t in school yet, so we pretty much just got up and did whatever the day did and if I didn’t get any work done, but oh well, I’ll do it later because she’s going to sleep until 9am, so no big deal if I work until 3. Then, baby number 2 came along and that’s no longer an option.

I hate stereotype that boys are boys, but boys are boys and he’s very intuitive and very curious and likes to be right in the thick of wherever mom is. My whole schedule changed, so the whole work whenever I want, that went right out the window. I panicked for a while and I had that horrible overwhelming feeling of, “I don’t think I can do this.” He’s sucking all the time out of my day. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

*Laughter*. Are you married?

Desiree:

We’re not married. We might as well be. We actually been friends for 13 years.

Rosemary:

I love that.

Desiree:

Yeah. We separated for a while and we actually shared custody of our daughter and now we have the second one together. So, we might as well be married after 13 years. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

How did all of that fit in with your business as well? That’s a lot to juggle with your relationship and having your second child and getting back together. Did that affect your business and how did you handle that?

Desiree:

It, you know, us working things out was a bittersweet moment because, you know, just like it was when it was just my daughter and I, I was able to run my business on my own terms and I didn’t have to worry about taking care of anybody else. When we reconciled and baby number 2 came along shortly after, I had 2 more humans to take care of. It did add to a lot of stress.

I was having to get up early with him and help him get out the door and make sure everything we needed to take care of together was taken care of. So, you know, the stress level did go up, but on the other side I now have somebody that I can lean on and he’s there to help and if I just need to leave and sit at a coffee shop and get some work done, it’s nice to know that he’s going to look at me and go, “Okay, go!” *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

That’s awesome.

Desiree:

Yeah, so it’s nice to have the support.

Rosemary:

It is interesting and there’s nights and days and nights and days that I think about people who have either now are empty nesters and have all the time in the world to spend on their business or people who don’t have children and you watch them grow their business so much faster because they have a lot of time on their hands. So, that’s an interesting perspective you said that you only had to take care of your daughter, it does give you a little bit more time.

Desiree:

Yeah, it does. When it was just the two of us, I mean, my business it was almost like a bullet right out of the gun. It took off fast because I was able to, you know, I was able to devote all this time to it and especially with the joint custody of my daughter, 3 and a half days out of the week I was alone. I was pretty much free to put as much time and energy into my business as it took. It was a big shift having more people to take care of, but it’s exciting how both things are still growing. I am excited about that and I’m happy about that.

Rosemary:

That’s awesome. I hear you have your executive in the background. *Laughter*.

Desiree:

Yes, I do, I do. He has just moved into a big boy bed, so he helps himself out of bed at 6am now instead of 8am like it used to be. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

Oh, lucky you.

Desiree:

Yes, yes, he’s excited though he’s in a big boy bed and so he gets excited.

Rosemary:

Oh and he wants to share it with the world. *Laughter*.

Desiree:

Yes, exactly. He’s got lots to say too. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

When you transitioned to your VA business to your marketing business, what were some of the steps you had to take to do that?

Desiree:

Well, making the transition felt very smooth for me actually, because I really had to take a step back and say, “Okay, was it about my business that I love doing?” On the flip side of that, “What was it that I can’t stand doing?” So I was looking at the services that I was offering my clients and I started to pick out the ones I didn’t like doing and I stopped offering those to people.

I sat down with this big giant poster paper and literally started drawing what will an ideal business look for me? So, I made a list of, you know, this is what I love doing for my business, this is what I love doing for myself, this is what I love doing for others, how can I make this a pre-package?

So, mapping out and creating strategies is really the key to how I made the transition from offering all these services to, okay, now I’m already to narrow my niche. I’m ready to narrow down the services that I offered – beef that up even more. You know, just the strategies and still to this day, even though I’ve been doing it for a couple of years, I still every couple of months grab a piece of paper and say, “Okay, the next 6 months on are going to look like this. This is what I’m focusing on.”

Rosemary:

I think that’s an awesome tip and I love that you sat down and picked out what you didn’t like to do. I lot of people are afraid to drop services, because in their mind that means less money. What did that do for you in your business when you did that?

Desiree:

Well, I had the same fear. I wanted to kind of be that one-stop shop. Whatever you need done for your business, I can do it all, and if I don’t know how, I will figure it out! Well, I was wasting a lot of time and money trying to teach myself things that somebody had asked me to do. I was spending a lot of time and energy on things I realized I didn’t like doing.

So, what happened when I made the shift and really focused on some key services is I actually grew. I actually started making more money, because I became more of a wanted commodity. Anybody can say, “Oh, I can help you grow your business by answering your emails or monitoring your calender.” But when somebody’s saying, “Oh my gosh, I need to figure out why my marketing isn’t working.” And when I’m able to provide that for them, it really helps me sky-rocket my business. I was ironically able to raise my prices because I had a narrow key of, “This is what I can do for you.” So, people were willing to actually pay more because this was my specialty.

Rosemary:

I love that and that is exactly what happens to people when they get very narrow with their niche and about what they wanna do and about what they want to offer. It’s amazing when you start increasing your prices, you get more attention don’t you?

Desiree:

It’s absolutely true and you add more value to both your business and the people you are serving when you’re able to increase what you offer as a far as your specialty and narrowing down your niche.

I had, when first starting my business, I was a virtual assistant for entrepreneurs. How much more vague can you get. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

*Laughter*.

Desiree:

And, I really started to realize, once I narrow down the niche, it actually became easier for me to market my business, because I know where mompreneurs hang out because they’re my peers. I know what they’re struggling in their business, because I’ve gone through the same struggles.

I may not necessarily know what an accountant is struggling with in his entrepreneurial business. I don’t understand what a massage therapist when she’s trying to go through, but I sure as heck can tell you I know exactly what a mompreneur who works from home with kids in-toe, I know exactly what she’s going through and I know exactly how I can help her.

Rosemary:

I love that. I started my business out the same way. I was motivating other moms. I always wanted to motivate moms.

Desiree:

Yeah.

Rosemary:

Create a life that they love and it’s narrowed down to entrepreneurial moms, which may even narrowed down to home-schooling entrepreneurial moms. Now, that’s a niche I couldn’t think I could down any further. *Laughter*.

Desiree:

It’s amazing how the tighter you get, how more your business actually grows. You become kind-of the authority in the conversation amongst the people who are the home-schooling moms and the home-schooling mompreneurs. You suddenly become, “Oh, we’ve got to talk to Rosemary because she knows home-schooling. So, it’s amazing how once you keep narrowing down even farther that it really actually causes your business to grow.

Rosemary:

It really does. The clarity that you get is amazing and it’s so much more helpful to your clients. It’s something that’s very difficult to do. It took me years to get to this. Years.

Desiree:

Yeah, it’s a hard concept to grasp. It’s hard to think, Oh, I should only serve 30 people in a room instead of a 150. You know, you think the more you serve the more money you’re going to make and really creates you as the authority on one topic and people become more and more interested.

It’s almost like, I like to actuate it to, you walk into a party and you walk in and go, “Hey everybody, I’m here to be friends,” versus if you were to walk in and say, “Oh, there’s a group of people that look like I could intermingle with them.” And you walk over and introduce yourself and you end up having a conversation. Where as if you were to walk in and say, “Hey, let’s be friends.” Everybody kind of looks at you like, “Who’s this crazy person?”

So, you know, you kind of have to look at your business as a cocktail party and who would you want to hang out with at a cocktail party and who would you have the best conversation with? It’s not going to be everybody. You’re not going to walk into a room and instantly be friends with everybody. The same thing with your business, you’re not going to resonate with everybody, so you need to find the market you do resonate with. 

Rosemary:

I couldn’t agree more. That is a great analogy. You know what? You don’t necessarily want all those people in the first place, because that will make your life miserable and make what you do really, really hard.

Desiree:

And, it’s noise. It’s almost like the white noise of your business. You’re constantly trying to make everybody happy, so you’re spreading yourself thin. You constantly hearing, “Oh, I need this and I need this and I want somebody who can do this,” and you’re thinking to yourself, “I can do that, I can do that!” You know, now you’re spending hours trying to teach yourself how to do it or there’s crossover and you’re now trading your time for money and it’s just stressful. It’s so overwhelming. It’s something, that’s one of the first things I try and teach my clients is, let’s talk about who it is you really want to be doing business with and let’s focus on how to find them and how to get them interested in what you have to say.

Rosemary:

How long does it usually take them, when you’re working with them, to narrow down? To something they’re comfortable with and they’re happy with. A lot of people narrow something down, they’re not necessarily comfortable or happy with it.

Desiree:

Well, you know a lot of times they think they know the niche that want to work with, so it usually takes at least 3-6 months to have that ah-ha moment, because they don’t know. They might think they want to work with the soccer mom and have that be their target market, but they might realize that’s not who they..they may not want to do business with them after doing business with them for awhile. Maybe they have a certain schedule or mindset that doesn’t resonate with them.

So, it takes a little finesse, but it usually takes at least 3-6 months of playing around with who you’re doing business with and what works for you.

Rosemary:

How hard is that for someone, let’s say, when you get into a coaching program, a lot of people think, “Okay, we’re just going to start taking action and things are going to start happen..that doesn’t necessarily happen with a coaching program, so generally, you won’t see things start happening until the 3-6 months and then you see the big difference if you coach with someone for a year. How hard is it as a coach and person who’s working with people to keep them on board to get them to the end vision?

Desiree:

Well, it’s funny. As a couch, I think becoming a coach was easy for me because I have that desire to help other people succeed. So, I want to stick with them through the course, even if they decide, you know, 6 months down the road they’re no longer my coaching client for whatever reason, I’ll still check in with people. I’ll ask them, “Okay, how’s that working out? How’s that working out you targeting full-time dads? Did that work for you business?”

A lot of times they’ll go, “No, they didn’t buy anything.” Sometimes you have to hit them again, you have to reach out to them again and go, “You know what, I want to know how did it work when you were my coaching client and what happened?” A lot of the times they’ll go, “I missed the mark on something, let’s revisit, let’s look at what I need to do.” They almost need to re-focus and have that re-vision, so a lot of times they come back. *Laughter*. They come back and go, “I tried what you told me, I realized that’s not who I want to work with, now I know who it is that I want to work with thanks to the steps we went through.” *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

That’s awesome. I love that they’re still continuing. They don’t just go, “I give up. This didn’t work, so I’m not going to do anything.”

Desiree:

Exactly. You know, the people that do give up, a lot of times, no matter what you say to them, nothing is going to stick. They’re going to give up. They don’t have the motivation to be an entrepreneur. Sometimes you just have to go, “Well, I tried with this one. No matter what I say, they’re going to find a reason why they’re business isn’t doing so well.” You just kind of have to go, “Okay, I tried my best.” You can see the entrepreneurs that go, “Okay, I’m willing to try what it takes and I’m going to try it out and if it doesn’t work I’m going to try again.”

Rosemary:

What are some of the key components to your most successful clients that you’ve had? The entrepreneurs that are really make it happen. What do you see in them that you don’t see in other clients?

Desiree:

I think the thing that I see the most is that mindset shift where they thought their problem was lack of Facebook likes, but suddenly after working with me for awhile, it has nothing to do, really, with their lack of marketing, they don’t have the clarity. So, once they see the clarity of, “Oh my gosh, it’s not social media or it’s not my email campaigns, it’s me.”

Then, it’s almost like the gates open up and the lights start shining. I think the biggest thing is when they get the right mindset and they suddenly realize, “This is my business and I have control over it and I need to decide who it is I want to work with. I need to decide that I’m going to take with my business.” I think that’s when they have that break through and they have that realization that, I’m in charge and I get to determine how I grow my business and how much money I’m making.

Rosemary:

Yeah, there’s this interesting phenomenon that’s starting to happen that I’ve noticed. One is that people who have very large lists are starting to drop their list because they have to pay a lot of money to pay these lists. We’re talking like $50,000 or something like that, but they’re paying money out to maintain this list. The more people you have on your list, the more money you pay to the email service. What they’re finding is, back in the day you wanted to have lots and lots of Facebook and get lots of action on Twitter, you still want that, but at the same time it doesn’t necessarily mean you’re attracting that ideal client and those people are going to become your clients and they’re going to invest in you.

Like today, it was really interesting. I always find this fascinating. So, I’m going to be doing this new series on picking like, national doughnut day or national information about drugs day and I’m going to interview entrepreneurial moms in those niches just to do something different and new and someone sent me this lady who makes brownies. Turns out she was on Oprah and she’s been on the today’s show and all this stuff and she has a big business based on brownies alone. It turns out national brownie day is December 8th. So, I’m looking her up and what was interesting was is that her fan page was really small, yet she has an extremely successful business. 

Desiree:

Yeah. Yeah.

Rosemary:

I see that over and over again, so what I’m saying to my listeners is you don’t have to have a huge following on social media to make really good money.

Desiree:

You know, it’s very true. I think, we used to have..internet marketers, especially 10 years ago, got the notion that if you don’t have a big email list, you’re never going to make any money. I think, we’re now learning it’s definitely quality over quantity.

Rosemary:

Yes.

Desiree:

If you’re not selling a very generic product, you don’t need a big list. Just like you were saying, I mean, somebody who has been on Oprah doesn’t have a big social media following, you would think, you know, it would be the opposite.

Rosemary:

Right!

Desiree:

You have to have 100,000 people that are following you to get Oprah’s attention. No, you don’t! You just have to a really good business! You have to know your audience and not everybody’s going to like brownies, but if you find the right people who do, and you really connect with them and take the time, you can make more money off a repeat customer than you can 1,000 people who come in for a one time only. So, having a list or a small following doesn’t mean anything any more. It really doesn’t.

Rosemary:

It really doesn’t. You know, I might have a new show idea just for like the month. I should interview entrepreneurial moms that have been on the Oprah show.

Desiree:

*Laughter*.

Rosemary:

*Laughter*. And see what happens with their business.

Desiree:

Oh! That’s a great idea. I love it.

Rosemary:

Yeah, that’ll be a good one, because that’s another one that’s going to be on that happened to be she was the…..She had her own event business, event planning business, and Oprah hired and used her for many, many years, but she was just a person doing events and a friend said, “Hey, you should check her out, she’s really great.” It’s not like she had this big huge following or anything like that, it was because she was doing very niche things and doing exactly what she loved that people shared that, because people loved what she loved. They were excited because she was excited.

Desiree:

Yeah, there’s something to be said for loving your business. I see the mistake so many times, people get into, people think they start a business because they need money, but once they realize they’re in it for something passionate and they’re doing something that they love, business starts to come naturally.

You talk about to everybody because you’re so excited about it, not in a sale-ie, used car kind of way, but just because it’s second nature to talk about what you do. I think there’s definitely something to be sad for word of mouth. I mean, you don’t need a billion social media followers, you need 10 good friends who are willing to talk about your business because you’re good. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

Yes. Yes, I love that.

Desiree:

It’s amazing to me how easy it is to actually build a referral base business when you’re good. So, that’s one of the things that I..I struggled with it in the beginning. I thought, “Gosh. I have to have a huge Facebook following and look how many likes I can get, look at how many people are following me on Twitter.” But, it doesn’t mean a lick if you’re not providing services that people want and they need and if you’re not any good at it.

So, I’ve really been teaching find a skill that you are naturally good at and build on that. Really get good at what it is you love doing about your business and people will start coming to you. You’ll start getting the phone calls. People will start referring you. Oh my gosh, you’ve gotta go check out Mandy. She does great! She makes great cookies or she’s an amazing photographer. It’s word of mouth is really going to build your business once you really start enjoying and knowing what you’re doing.

Rosemary:

Yeah, I love what you were saying is focus on that one thing. We, as entrepreneurs, there’s a lot of bright and shiny objects and there’s a lot of people out there saying you should be doing this and you should be doing that, but once you find that one thing, don’t let anything else come into your vision.

Desiree:

That’s so true. Well, just as we were talking about narrowing down your niche, narrow down your skills and really find what you enjoy doing and what you’re good at and that’s what you should continue to do. If you’re not any good at accounting, hire somebody to do the accounting for you in your business. Don’t spend hours and hours trying to figure out how to balance your books, because that’s energy pulling from you are good at and the things you do enjoy about your business.

Rosemary:

Yeah, I couldn’t agree more and I totally lost my train of thought.

Desiree:

*Laughter*.

Rosemary:

Ahhhhh

Desiree:

It happens to me all the time. I think, you know, it’s so funny when people say they have shiny object syndrome. I thought, I think everything is a shiny object to me. Oh, I have a meeting or I have a training I need to get ready for, I suddenly need to go do the laundry. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

*Laughter*. OH MY GOSH, that’s so, so true! It’s amazing when I have a big project how clean the house gets. *Laughter*.

Desiree:

Yes, I was telling the man that the other night when I was doing big video training series last week. I thought, you know, the house hasn’t been this clean and here I am talking about how busy I am with my business and he look at me and goes, “I’m okay with a clean okay.” I said, “Yes, but we’re also okay with a successful business.” *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

That’s exactly right. The clean house does not bring money in.

Desiree:

Exactly. I told him, I said, “You know, I don’t run a cleaning service.”

Rosemary:

*Laughter*.

Desiree:

I said, “If I did, you owe me a couple of years of back-pay, mister.” *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

Exactly. Well, let’s talk about this for a little bit. When people start their business one of the ways you create freedom is by delegating those things that you’re not good at, so you have to have email, you have to have certain things in your business in order to create a business. When is it a good time for someone to invest in a VA and get help?

Desiree:

The second you are spending more time answering email than actually building your business, you need to hire help. It was a big ah-ha moment for me because I’m very much an independent control freak, which you know, people used to tell me, “You’ll make a great entrepreneur.” Well, the downside to that, I make a horrible entrepreneur because I want to do it all myself, so there’s only so many hours in the day. Add a couple of kids in the mix and now you have less hours, so you really need to take a step back.

What I did for one week was I timed myself on everything that I was working at and the things that were taking me longer than an hour, that were not making me money, I said, “Okay, if I were to pay somebody, how much more money could I make if I wasn’t spending 3 hours answering my emails every morning?” or, “How much more money could I make if I was paying somebody x amount of dollars to schedule all my social media?” And, I actually started to make more money when I brought on help. It freed up my time to do the things that I enjoyed doing, so I would definitely say, if you have the slightest bit of overwhelm feeling, it’s time to hire help.

Rosemary:

Yeah, I had a mentor once say, “You hire help before you think you need it.”

Desiree:

Yes, that’s very true. I actually wished I hadn’t waited. I think I got so set into my way of doing things that it was very hard for me to bring on somebody. I kept thinking that they’re not going to do it as good as I can or they won’t get it done as fast as I do. In reality, if I had brought somebody on sooner, then they can actually helped me develop more systems and a better a faster system and I wouldn’t have wasted so much time trying to do it all myself.

Rosemary:

It’s really interesting considering you were a VA in your past life.

Desiree:

I know.

Rosemary:

*Laughter*.

Desiree:

I know. It’s very ironic I think when I had a hard time bringing on help when I was, you know, because I’m so used to being that support system. It was hard for me to have the mindset I, not only need help, but I deserve somebody to help me.

Rosemary:

I love that. You do deserve it. You listening out there, you deserve to have somebody help you. You don’t have to do it all by yourself. When you reach out and ask for help, miracles begun to happen and everything that you’ve been waiting for, starts happening!

Desiree:

Yes, and it gives you. You know what really happened with my mindset when I brought on a VA, I almost had, suddenly I felt like a CEO of a business. I wasn’t just a, oh, I have a little business that I get to work from home. I was suddenly the CEO of a marketing company, because I felt like having somebody on a team gave me that permission to feel that way. I became, I seriously became more focused on being a business owner and not just somebody who ran a business.

Rosemary:

Yeah, exactly. It just does change the mind shift. That was something I knew for many years. I heard it over and over again about hiring help and hiring people to do what you don’t like to do, which is for me, just about everything other than what I’m doing right at the moment. *Laughter*.

Desiree:

*Laughter*.

Rosemary:

It’s hard to wrap your head around that. It’s hard to let go of that money, because a lot of times you’re going to lose a little bit of money before you’re doing that, before making more money, but it opens, like you said, it opens up new possibilities for you to keep creating and doing what you love. So, you’re creating more and your attracting more because of it.

Desiree:

That’s exactly it. You are attracting more. You know, like I said, when I first realized, okay, I need to look and see what I’m doing. When I realized how much time I was spending on things that weren’t making me money, I actually started to cry and thought, “No wonder! No wonder why I’m struggling. I’m spending so much time creating a graphic or writing out and scheduling emails.” I thought, “If I could give this to somebody else to do, I could actually make twice as what I’m paying them because I can now go make money.” *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

Well, I know from me and I think it’s pretty common for other people. It was hard for me to let go of the idea of somebody writing my stuff for me.

Desiree:

Yes.

Rosemary:

And it not being me, because I didn’t feel like it was not authentic. I didn’t feel like it was real, because I wasn’t the one writing it. Yet, they’re people out there that can write your emails to make it sound like you or you can write potions of it and they morph it for you.

Desiree:

Yeah, that’s actually what I ended up doing. I ended up hiring an article writer and what I did, I took all of her stuff and I said, “Okay. Here’s the topics I need articles on.” She wrote them and I just went in and added my personality to it a little bit more. So, I felt like it wasn’t, I didn’t feel like a phony. I felt like, “Okay.” She got the meaty, educational part of it. I’m going to add my personality to it.

So, instead of an article taking me an hour, it took me 5 minutes to go in and add in a couple of tweaks here and there. It made a huge difference. So, now it’s actually exciting when I say, “Oh! I need to look at my blog post next month. I’m going to pluck some..” It takes me, now instead of an hour for one article, I can probably punch out 10 of them in an hour just by going in and making a couple of tweaks, so it really, you know.

That was hard for me too. Somebody has to sound like me? But you’re not me. You’re not me. I’m unique! So, it was hard for me to make that shift as well of, “Can somebody else sound like me? Can somebody else do what I need done?” So, it’s definitely a shift, but it’s a good one. Once you make that decision to hire somebody and it doesn’t have to be a full-time VA. You can go on freelance sites like oDesk and hire somebody for project help for smaller stuff. It does make a big difference and it takes a big load off your shoulders of knowing that you’ve got support and you’re not alone.

Rosemary:

Yeah, so like, this podcast, I could take this podcast and send it over to oDesk and have somebody..I had somebody do a transcript just last week for $10.

Desiree:

Yeah.

Rosemary:

For a whole hour! And I got complete transcripts. Then I can take that and send that off to somebody and have them write like 3 articles from that hour and I’m done.

Desiree:

Yeah and how much time did it take you? Other than recording that podcast, it probably took you a whole matter of 10 minutes to send everything off to everybody. You’re able to go make money with your business instead of doing transcribing. Let somebody else do it. Somebody else is very good at transcribing and they love it doing it, please ask them to do it for you. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

Oh my gosh, yes. That’s the key. People, if you’re sitting there doing stuff and you’re like, “Oh, I hate this, but I gotta do it, I gotta do it.” There’s people that’s doing the stuff that you hate to do that just absolutely get off doing what you hate to do.

Desiree:

Yeah. It’s so funny. I recently partnered up with a writing coach and she was telling me. I said, “Gosh,” I said, “I’m not a very strong writer.” She goes, “That’s okay,” she goes, “I hate marketing.” I’m like, “But you’re really good at it!” She’s like, “No, I hate it. I sit and I struggle and it frustrates me.” I said, “But it’s so easy!” And she said, “That’s become you love it!” I said, “Well, writing is not easy for me, and you do it everyday.” She said, “That’s become I love it!” I said, “See.”

Rosemary:

Yep.

Desiree:

You gotta find the people that you can build your business with. You know, build partnerships that accent that you don’t like doing or what you’re not good at doing. Even if you’re not hiring a VA, if you’re finding business partners that you can refer people to, it makes such a big difference. It’s almost like an arsenal of people in your back pocket.

Rosemary:

I love that and I couldn’t agree more. One of the things that I also wanted to point out was how you had said that you pick a topic and have somebody write the article and then you add yourself into it. The thing is out there, just to be clear, there’s nothing new out there, it is just your personal take on it. So, when Desiree sends out these topics, these are topic that have been probably covered since the dawn of man. The creation of man. I mean, there’s very little new things that come out. It’s just how people twist it and make their own.

Desiree:

That’s exactly true. It’s funny you bring that up. Just the other day I was writing a training and I thought, “Oh my gosh, how many people have said this same exact thing before?” and my strategic brain-storming partner, she said, “Yeah, but how many people have never even heard it.” I went, “Ah..very good point.” She said, “People are brand new into their business everyday and they’ve never heard that you need to send an email out at 6am. They’re out there wondering, ‘When should I send out an email’ and here you come telling them the answer.”

Yes, it’s been said by thousands of other people that you should send out your email at 6am on a Tuesday, but they’ve never heard it. I thought, “That’s amazing and that’s brilliant. Okay, that makes me feel better about sending out an email when to send your emails when I know that other people are teaching it.” *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

It’s exactly true. We got caught up with what we know and we just assume everybody else knows it. We think it’s old news. It’s really hard to get past that. People are like, “Your kids are awesome. How are they awesome?” I’m like, “I don’t know, I just do what I do.” *Laughter*.

Desiree:

That’s exactly it. Yeah, yeah. I had somebody just about my kids the other day, “Oh, well, how did you teach your daughter how to be so polite?” I said, “Uhh, I don’t know, I just do it?” and they said, “Oh my son, you know, has some behavioral problems.” I don’t know what to tell ya, I just do it. So, you know, in conversation I was telling, you gotta have a schedule with your kids and you gotta make sure that you’re consistent and she was like, “I never even thought about that being the problem.” I went, “Oh look, she learned something from me I didn’t even know I knew.” *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

*Laughter*. Exactly, exactly. There’s new moms born everyday, there’s new businesses born everyday. How many people are there? There’s billions of people in the world that have not had access to what we’ve had access to that need our help.

Desiree:

Exactly. There’s always, there’s always new beast to the scene that are going to need what you have. That’s one of things I try and teach my coaching clients as well. As long as you’re bringing your personality to it, you have very valuable information to share. Who cares if people have been doing for thousands of years. We’re not all thousands years old, so there’s people who have never experienced what you’ve gone through.

Rosemary:

Let’s talk about your language skills. *Laughter*.

Desiree:

*Laughter*.  Yes, my language skills.

Rosemary:

Do you teach those to your children? *Laughter*.

Desiree:

*Laughter*. I teach them not to be like mommy, because I do have a big potty mouth when it comes to marketing my business. It’s funny because no matter what kind of email I send out, I always get a handful of people that tell me I should be shameful and how unprofessional, but it’s really funny because the group of peers, you know, business peers, my strategic partners, we’re all the same.

That’s the circle we run and we run it very well together. It’s really funny I always have people that say, “How can you talk like that in your marketing material, you’re suppose to be professional.” I thought to myself, because it used to really bother me, maybe they’re right, maybe I shouldn’t talk like that. Then I had somebody say, “Yeah, but how many other people don’t talk like that and they’re boring.” They don’t stand out from anybody. You sound like everybody else. So, you know, I thought, “This is who I am.”

Yes, I’m sure that I could vanilla down my emails, but if you have a challenge the way I word my emails, you’re going to have a challenge with the way I would be your business coach, because I tell it like it is. A lot of times that might include an f-bomb in there. So, if you’re uncomfortable with it being written, you’re going to be uncomfortable with a phone call with us. So, I like to look at it as, I’m letting you know ahead of time this is how I am and if it doesn’t work for you, that’s okay, I wouldn’t be a good fit as a coach for you anyway.

I’m letting them know up front who I am and it’s opening the doors of, you don’t have to work with me and I’m okay with that. There’s other people out there that you’re going to want to work with and they might be a better fit. It’s kind of like I’m creating the filter without wasting anybody’s time is kind of how I look at it. It’s who I am and it’s how I talk. Maybe it’s coming from being with a construction worker for the last 13 years. I just picked up his language skills. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:
Well, I would manage working in Las Vegas, they’re not exactly the purest out there. *Laughter*.

Desiree:

No. I forget sometimes I’ve been in Vegas this long and I think it’s rubbed off a bit. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

I think it’s great you stand on your own. There’s lots of business people out there who use the words and lots of people beat them up for it, but you know what? They’re making millions. I know one that’s making 5 million a year and she has it in her business title and it’s like, you know what. If I was making 5 million dollars, I wouldn’t care what anybody thought either. I’d keep writing and using it because it’s obviously working.

Desiree:

Exactly, exactly. You know, you’ve got to find your personality. So many years people were like, “You have to be business-like, you have to be professional, you have to follow these rules.” Well, I’m here tell you the rules of business are changing big time. We’re not stuffy suits and let’s sit in a board room.

We’re not doing that anymore. We almost have this new generation of entrepreneurs that are coming up and they’re butt kickers. They’re no-holds barred. We’re here, we’re loud, we’re proud, and we’re here to rock your businesses for you.

It’s exciting to see there is a shift in a way that businesses..I know a lot of people have a hard time with it because they’re so, I don’t want to call them old school, but they’re very, you know, this is the way business is and it should be this way and everybody should be this way, but there’s a whole new group of us coming up through the raising saying, “Nu-uh, it’s not longer business as usual.”

Rosemary:

It isn’t. And I love, love, love seeing all the different personalities and how they morph that into their business. When they do that, I’ve seen people struggle and try do it the whole stiff-style of business and when they finally open up and free themselves, their businesses just expand. I love seeing different things with entrepreneurs. Yesterday I was on a Skype call with someone, interviewing them to help hire them for their services to take some stuff off my plate and on the Skype call, his description was, “May or may not be wearing pants.”

Desiree:

HA! I love it.

Rosemary:

You would have never got that at a corporate world.

Desiree:

No, I love it. In fact, I’ve even opened up an email with that exact line before. It’s so funny, especially home-based entrepreneurs. We don’t have the bosses that are telling us what we have to wear everyday, so it’s exciting. I think it’s very freeing. There’s something very much calling freedom about this whole new batch of entrepreneurs that are saying, “You’ve got a personality, it’s time to let that shine.” I think that’s really going to start making you stand out in the crowd.

You have to have personality now. There’s so many business owners and there’s so many service providers. I mean, you look up email educator or people that are teaching marketing. There’s, oh gosh, billions of people teaching what I teach, but there’s only one of me with my personality and that’s going to be make the big difference, that’s what’s going to attract clients.

Rosemary:

Hallelujah-Amen!

Desiree:

That’s right. That’s right. Woo hoo. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

*Laughter*. So, let’s talk, you have a program called..It’s a school, it has 8 module online program on crack. *Laughter*.

Desiree:

Yes, yes. It is the momma-owned business school and it, I created it because when I was building my business, I didn’t realize that I was going through phases and there were certain aspects of my business that I didn’t realize I need to fix this before I can go fix something else, so what I did, I took the 7 stages of growing your business. I started with, okay, what’s the most important thing that an entrepreneur can have? And it’s not marketing skills, it’s not you have to have a great publicist, you have to have the right mindset.

You have to know…Like you and I were talking about earlier, you have to know what you’re good at and what you like, so that’s where I start the course and then we move up to, you know, creating a plan and knowing your vision and right into email marketing and how to do time management. They each go into the next stage, so once you have your mindset under control, you can start working on your goals.

Once you work on your goals, you can start making your plan, when you have your plan, you take a look at, Okay, well where am I struggling with my time? So, I go through a time management course and then I go into the marketing. Here’s how you do your emails, here’s how you do your social media, this is what you need to know about launching your new product.

So that’s really like where the school became, kind of like, this is was my journey. I’m now going to help others so they don’t have to struggle through everything I went through. I know as busy moms, we don’t have an hour to sit down and do a webinar or a training call, so all the modules are no longer than 20 minutes. They’re are 10-15 minute video chunks and there’s a little bit of homework that goes with each module.

Rosemary:

Well, that sounds like a great program. How long is the program overall?

Desiree:

It’s an 8 week course, but it’s actually membership program that you can stay, because what I have done, I built an educational and networking forum and I have partnered with some other great experts in each of the stages, so I’ve got a mindset expert that offered an additional training and I’ve got a time management expert that she does a free training in there for me. I’ve worked with other fields like I’ve got a former attorney that talks about business complaints and why you need to form an LLC. So, really it’s kind of like a whole library and a whole community. You have the intial 8-week course and then you continue working in the group, you know, through the networking and the additional training offerings.

Rosemary:

Well, that sounds like a fantastic program. I love the fact that you have other people in there teaching them about different parts of their business.

Desiree:

Yeah, at first I thought I needed to be the expert. I have to train everybody on everything, but you know  I realized, I don’t want to talk about money. I don’t want to talk about business complaints, but it’s still information that small business owners, they need to know, because I didn’t know I needed to form an LLC to protect your personal assets, so when I found that out I was like, “Oh my gosh! Other people need to know this, but I don’t know how to teach it.” So, I thought, “You know what? Let me give the core training of what I went through and the 7 stages and then let me bring in other experts to expand on that and to help the mompreneur to really understand what it takes to build her business.”

Rosemary:

Yeah. I just love that, because you do need all of those. I love that you’re letting go of so much and you’re letting go of not being your own personal VA and letting go of all these parts of your business that aren’t you.

Desiree:

Yeah, but I still want to be that resource, I wanna make sure that people understand I know what you’re going through and I can help you. I may not be the one doing the training itself, but I’m going to show you the direction you need to go into and I’m going to bring the experts to you. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

I love that. What is your favorite book that you’re reading right now or that you’ve ever read?

Desiree:

I actually have two books that have really made an impact on my business. The first one is Launch by Jeff Walker. He talks about building product launches and that was really a lot of ah-ha moments. He really talks about how you need to make sure your audience is engage before you offer a product, so that’s the most recent one that I read that was kind of an ah-ha.

The book that probably changed everything about my entire life, not just my business is Train Your Brain by Dana Wilde. Dana is a, she’s a brain-training authority, as I like to say. She teaches not just mantras, but she teaches how the way you’re thinking, what it’s physically doing, and how it physically works. You hear a lot of people that talk about, “Oh, you need to have affirmations and all this stuff.” And to me, for the longest time that felt like fluff. Like, “Oh! Be a happy person and happy things will happen.” I thought, “Yeah right, what about the rest of us?”

Well, Dana, actually teaches the science behind how your brain thinks. I’m very much a science person, so when I first heard of Dana, it was a huge ah-ha for me. I got to see to how it physically works and why, why having a mantra and why watching how you speak actually does make a difference in your action that you’re taking throughout your day. So, Train Your Brain by Dana Wilde is probably the book I recommend every single entrepreneur read, because it’s going to teach you the right mindset before you can even build a successful business.

Rosemary:

I love that. That last question is what is your favorite junk food?

Desiree:

Oh, my favorite junk food? Pizza. I love pizza. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

What kind, do you like cheese, are you a basic cheese lover, which I hear the Italians say that as just like, the heart of pizza.

Desiree:

Yes. You know, I have an Italian man living in my house and we do love a good pizza, but I do have to say that we suddenly have a soft spot for the supreme. I want a little bit of everything on my pizza. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

Me too. It’s a whole meal that way.

Desiree:

Exactly. I feel like I’m getting my veggies if I have a pizza with olives and mushrooms on it. I feel like I’ve now hit all of the food groups with one bite. *Laughter*.

Rosemary:

I love it. Thank you Desiree for being on the show. You can reach out to Desiree at http://desireemarketing.com/. What are your favorite social media tools for people to contact you with?

Desiree:

Facebook and Twitter. My Facebook is https://www.facebook.com/DesireeMarketing and my Twitter is at https://twitter.com/DesireeMktg. So the shorten version of marketing.

Rosemary:

Awesome. Thank you Desiree.

Desiree:

Thank you so much, this has been a blast.

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